Saturday, November 21, 2015

E. L. Moore's Uncle Sim's Snuffery

[E. L. Moore's Uncle Sim's Snuffery; J. R. Fisher collection]

E. L. Moore's Uncle Sim's Snuffery was published in the December 1975 issue of Railroad Modeler. A snuff mill and associated snuff quarry you say? Well, lest us not forget those deposits of molasses that required a mine. Mr. Moore clearly stumbled across some odd geological formations in his time. I'll let him tell it from the article's intro.
I can already hear some skeptics pishing and pshawing at the idea of quarrying snuff, but to these I can only point out that scientists have made a quite simple explanation of the phenomenon and that Ripley on his "Believe It Or Not" column, gave it quite a display.
I've had to build my model largely from a faulty memory, aided to some degree by some much faded postcard pictures and some almost indecipherable letters written my mother [sic] by Uncle Sim. Plus some imagination of unknown percentage.
The article shows there was a small, narrow gauge Baldwin 0-4-0 and a string of mine cars from AHM that were used for mining snuff and driving it right into large end door with that chunk of track sticking out. I didn't see the train at the meet-up.
Uncle Sim's reminds me a lot of the Stuckum Glue Works as to overall shape and design even though Stuckum is brick.
The roof uses Mr. Moore's tried-and-true paper metal technique.
And that roof comes off to reveal a fully detailed interior. Unfortunately I didn't get a good photo the insides - too much shadow.

5 comments:

  1. I just have to comment again on how wonderful it is to see EL Moore's models in color as opposed to the black and white photos in the magazines. Color makes them even more amazing.

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    1. Colour, and the fact that these models are in good condition, makes them look new. Looking at the magazine black-and-whites today can give the impression that the models are dated and from an era with no relevance to ours. However, I think the colour emphasizes their vitality gives them back their place in our era. That vitality has been hidden a long time.

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  2. Everything today is buy this, buy that, place it all together on your layout. ELM showed true scratchbuilding and inspired me to new techniques of my own.

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    1. I agree things are more consumerist today. It's a golden age of good stuff to buy, but something is lost along the way. There seems to be strong do-it-yourself strain in some English blogs and it's likely in many other places as well - I just need to find it :-)

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  3. This building is a lot more like Rube's Rhubarb than Stuckum. Rube's has five tanks, and a slatted "crib", but it's the same layout overall, same positions for pieces.

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